a3 blackface #59 (Primary Title)

Iona Rozeal Brown, American, born 1966 (Artist)

2003
American
Paintings
Works On Paper
acrylic on paper
United States
Unframed: 49 3/4 × 38 in. (126.37 × 96.52 cm)
Framed: 58 1/2 × 46 1/2 in. (148.59 × 118.11 cm)
2004.67
Not on view

"What’s really interesting is being in another country and seeing how hip-hop is worn. It makes you wonder: who is putting this out here? Because there were a lot of the commercial gestures, a lot of the hats on the side, the swaggers, the crotch grabbing and the rubbing and the claiming to be from a particular field, if you will."—-iona rozeal brown

Brown—who styles her name in all lowercase letters— uses a3 as an abbreviation for “Afro-Asiatic allegory,” her series of prints and paintings based on the style of the Japanese ganguro (literally “blackface”) girls. These young women reject Japanese conventions of beauty— dark, straight hair and pale skin—by lightening and perming their hair and darkening their skin. a3 blackface #59 borrows stylistically from Japanese woodblock prints of the Edo period (1615–1868). Known as ukiyo-e prints, these popular, middle-class images depicted the shifting fashions and chaotic lives of the Tokyo amusement district. Brown, who isalso a disc jockey, found resonances between the transience of the contemporary entertainment industry and the “floating world” of Edo Japan.

Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Lindley T. Smith
Identity Shifts, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, VA, April 26 – July 27, 2014

Edo Pop: The Graphic Impact of Japanese Woodblock Prints, Minneapolis Institute of Art, Minneapolis, MN, October 30 - January 8, 2012

iona rozeal brown: a3 ... black on both sides, Spelman College Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA, January 22 - May 14, 2004
Ravenal, John B. Modern and Contemporary Art at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Richmond: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 2007. (P. 100-101).

"VMFA Celebrates Black History Month," Style Weekly, February 12, 2005. (Pp. 12-13).

(Sandroni Rey Gallery, Los Angeles) by 2004; Purchased with donated funds by the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA), Richmond, Virginia in [1]

[1] Accessioned November 18, 2004. See VMFA Curatorial file.
© iona rozeal brown

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