Relief of a Potter and His Wife (Primary Title)

Unknown (Artist)

Educational
1st-2nd century AD
Roman
marble
Overall: 23 1/2 × 29 × 3 in. (59.69 × 73.66 × 7.62 cm)
60.2
As a potter paints one of his wares, his wife sits opposite him, holding in one hand a loaf of bread and in the other what may be a fan (the symbol of a married woman). Reliefs portraying artisans were usually commissioned by freed slaves who were proud of their status and wealth. In this case, the woman is shown with the same conventions used to depict aristocratic women of the period-with the fashionable honeycomb hairstyle and stern face of a traditional Roman matron.
Adolph D. and Wilkins C. Williams Fund
Rothe, Ursula. The Toga and Roman Identity. London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2020. (fig. 4.4, bw, p. 98)

Bond, Sarah E. Trade and Taboo: Disreputable Professions in the Roman Mediterranean. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2016. Illustrated on book jacket cover.

Chrystal, Paul. “Women in Ancient Rome”. Stroud, Gloucestershire, Amberley Pulishing, 2013. Illustration no 1
Image released via Creative Commons CC-BY-NC

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